Hazel Warnock

Part of a series of interviews done by the Imnaha School Kids in 1987.
Interviewer: Grant Glaus

Q. What is your name?
A. Hazel Maxwell Warnock

Q. How long have you lived in this area?
A. 65 years

Q. Did you come here with your family?
A. No, my family never lived here. I just come to visit. My family lived at Wallowa. I came to visit my Aunt and Uncle that lived down here.

Q. What do you like about it here?
A. The quiet, that is it used to be, it isn’t so much anymore. Easy living.

Q. How many people lived here when you first came?
A. About the same number as there are now here in town, maybe 30 or 35.

Q. What was life like then?
A. Very good. Everybody lived and were good friends and visited every day or two. We don’t have many people that visit now.

Q. What was farming like?
A. I don’t know much about farming. It was a lot like it is now except they used horses to pull the machinery around.

Q. What kind of equipment was used?
A. They had rakes, mowers but all horse drawn.

Q. What changes have taken place since then?
A. Not very many. Look at the store and it looks the same as when I came here. it has had a little paint put on it, but it is real old.

Q. How did the changes affect you?
A. Not very much. Things don’t affect me very much. New people come, old people left or died and we just stayed.

Q. What changes do you think will come to this community in the near future?
A. I don’t think there will be too much more right around here close. Just this part right around here is all I’m interested in.

Q. What was the school like when you came?
A. Just a one room school, one teacher in one room. I have pictures of all the kids.

Q. How did you get to school?
A. I walked on foot all my school life.

Q. What subjects did you study?
A. Reading, writing and arithmetic, mostly. We had a few other things like Algebra, but they didn’t have the things they do now. I went to school in Wallowa until I started High School then I went to Enterprise.

Q. Where did your family get its food?
A. Most of it was raised. My Dad was a butcher, so we got our meat from the butcher shop.

Q. What did you do for fun?
A. We played, went to movies, went to parties, that was about all. We took care of ourselves pretty much. At home we could do what ever we wanted to do and got along fine. We had lots of company, lots of people came then.

Q. Is there any other interesting facts you would like to share with us?
A. My Aunt and Uncle had the store at one time. Two or three people had it before they did. After Aunt Anna had it, Bailey Maxwell had it. They run it for awhile. Then my husband, Jess, came down and worked for awhile and bought it. Jess bought it in 1926. We lived there for several years. Our first daughter was born during the time we lived there. We built this house in 1928 and moved in in 1929 and have lived here ever since. When we sold the store, the Post Office was in the store. At that time we built the present Post Office. There used to be a big dance hall where the Post Office is now. Jess tore down the dance hall and used the material to build the Post Office. We moved the Post Office then. I was Postmaster from 1943 to 1963. Jess was Postmaster for 17 years before that. The Postmaster job was in the family for 50 years all together. Inez Meyers took over after I quit.

My Dad came into the Paradise area “the Promised Land” in 1880. My Mother was raised in Oregon at Prairie City. Her family came to the county in the 1880′s. Finally they moved on to Wallowa, the whole family lived there or at least all the older ones. I met Jess down here at a Fourth of July dance, then that fall we both went to High School in Enterprise is how I got to know him. I didn’t like him at first, I don’t know how we got together. He passed away in 1968 from Lung cancer caused from smoking, so don’t smoke. We went on three long trips, to Chicago, Indiana, and Ohio and visited some of the family. Also where the Warnock family started, visited the old cemeteries. That’s what got me interested in finding out family history.

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